Cabin Life

I woke up this morning with a chilly breeze seeping into the open part of my sleeping bag.  From inside the bag, I could barely see the morning light. Damn, I thought, I let the fire go out again. Since I moved to the cabin on the hill, I’ve been learning valuable lessons about how thankful we should all be for gas powered furnaces and running water in our houses and the comfortability of not waking up freezing cold with purple fingertips and having to pee outside.

The cabin is decent sized, not huge but a good amount of open space, with a small wood burning stove to heat the entire thing. I moved here after the first week of December on the 11th, thinking in my mind, I’m tough and this will be a new adventure. There is no electricity besides whats run off an extension cord (an OSHA nightmare) and  no bathroom, kitchen, or plumbing in general installed at all yet.  The walls are uninsulated and really not walls at all because they are just studs and plywood uncovered.  Basically I’m living in a construction site. But Kenny has built this cabin with his own two hands, and despite being unfinished is an awesome example of what one person is capable of.  The cabin is constructed of materials that were donated or re-purposed by Kenny’s friends, and I think that it’s neat to see it all come together in one unique place like this.  When it’s a finished cabin come spring, it’ll be the most awesome place around here.

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After short notice in mid-November that I’d have to leave the place where I was staying in Rabbit Hash, Kentucky, I had begun looking for other places to live that were affordable. One day as I was sharing my plight with one of the locals, my friend, Kenny, he offered to rent me the “studio” as it’s called. He assured me that I’d love the cabin, and the view, and so I drove down the road and took a look. As usual, what one may see as an unfinished cabin full of junk, I saw as potential to be something cozy and homey as well as a way to challenge myself to live beyond the bounds of modern society while still maintaining connection with the world. I’ll be inspired by this, I thought, made stronger.

Before I moved in

Before I moved in

Before I moved in

Before I moved in

The Kitchen

The Kitchen

The Bathroom

The Bathroom

20 days later, I’m freezing, can’t feel my toes, fingertips or nose and am feeling unmotivated to dig a ditch in the cold frozen ground to run a line to the cistern. Although living without my own bathroom is the pits (thankfully Kenny lets me use his), digging ditches up hill, isn’t exactly easy, especially when it’s 20 degrees and the ground is frozen solid.

The first few days here I tried sleeping in the bed in the loft. I quickly realized that the mattress up there is a bit, uhh shall we say flexible. My back and hips were hurting so bad from sleeping on it, not to mention I was tired from crawling up and down the ladder in the middle of the night to put fire wood in the wood burning stove every few hours. So once I got a couch here, I started sleeping on it. It’s colder down stairs but I’m much closer to the stove to feed it, and the couch is oddly more supportive than the bed. I can’t wait to get my own mattress here.

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So my routine has been to get the fire going nice and hot before bed, close down the stove (close the dampers and floo to keep the heat in the stove) and crawl in my sleeping bag with it all the way up over my head. Despite the wood burning stove (which is too small for the space) its never really too warm in here, and due to the lack of insulation, there are spots where it is VERY cold and drafty. So I sleep bundled in two 20 degree rated sleeping bags (and usually a few layers of clothes).

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I then set an alarm for two and a half hours from the time (to wake up and feed the stove), then another for two and a half more hours and so on, until the time I think I’ll wake up.  That worked for the first few nights, but I’ve become so tired from that routine that I am literally sleeping through my alarms and the past two mornings I’ve woken up freezing cold with nothing but a few coals left in the stove. Last night it was 19 degrees outside and with no insulation and no fire going, I’m pretty sure it wasn’t more than 25 degrees  when I woke up.WP_20141231_002

Its been tough. Probably the most challenging place I’ve lived.  It’s hard work cutting, splitting, carrying wood.  Its frustrating not having a kitchen to prepare my food in or a bathroom to use. But if I can live here, and I can make life work, then I can live anywhere, and most likely, I’ll be more than grateful the next time I have running water, heat and all the modern amenities of life, and I will be more conscious about wastefulness and conservation.

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I know I’ve done a lot of complaining about life in the cabin, but I wanted to take just a minute to go over some of the things I love about cabin life.

#1 The View

Rabbit Hash is situated right on the river in the Ohio River Valley between Kentucky and Indiana and some of the most spectacular sunsets I’ve seen right here in my own front yard.

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There is a bald eagle’s nest back in the woods behind the cabin so some days I see the Eagles flying over the house, and down to the river to fish. I’ve also seen red fox, deer, turkey, possum, raccoon, coyote and we have a handful of kitties that hang around (some who I’ve buddied up with and now let in the cabin to keep warm). Looking out the windows in the loft of the cabin is like looking out onto my own little piece of heaven.WP_20141214_001

#2 The Town

Rabbit Hash is the first place I’ve ever lived that I felt attached to.  I have been surrounded by such a wonderful community of friends here and even if it’s cold as shit, my heart is warmed by the thought that I feel a sense of belonging here among my hashians. Rabbit Hash has been kind and generous to me and will forever hold a special place in my heart no matter where in the world I go.

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#3 The Rustic-ness

I love the smell of the wood burning stove, and the sound of it crackling, or roaring when I open the floo. I love the natural feel of being surrounded by wood and not the man made materials that fill most houses. It suits me, and my gypsy life. It’s simple and beautiful and despite all my complaints, I’m thankful for it.WP_20141214_003

#4 The Challenge

I enjoy pushing myself outside my comfort zone, and find that usually in life when you are able to do this, that you are rewarded. I have had many nights where I wanted to cry, because I was cold or miserable, but I’ve also had many nights here in the cabin filled with music, laughter, and good friends, some I’d even call family.

All in all the cabin has been an excellent learning experience. Its brought me joy and misery and is a reminder that in life, and in all things, you must find balance between the good and the bad. Here’s to Spring, it can’t come soon enough! lol

I’ll be doing a follow up post about life here at the cabin on the hill soon. So stay tuned for more gypsy adventures!

My Almost Make-out Session at Big Bone Lick and Randomly Running into Rabbit Hash

So this is the first blog post I’ve written on location thus far. I somehow wandered into the little town of Rabbit Hash Kentucky today.  It is the most awesome thing that has happened randomly in quite a while.  Earlier today I met one of my bridal clients to iron out the details for their upcoming wedding.  Since the coffee shop we met at was right around the corner from the venue I figured, once we wrapped up, that I could drive over and take a look to check out the lighting, setup, etc.  After my trip to the Florentine, which is in Union KY, I went driving around the area looking for a good outdoor location for bridal party photos.

The Florentine

The Florentine

About 5 minutes down the street I ran across a place called Farm Haven.  I decided to be nosy and pulled onto the property and took a look around. I couldn’t find anyone to talk to, besides an alpaca, so I walked back to my car with plans to look them up online and give them a call later. Note in phone: check! Its the first absolutely gorgeous day we’ve had in a while, so I figured why stop my adventure here. The big brown sign for Big Bone Lick State Park was staring me in the face and the gorgeous beaming sunshine and blue skies were beckoning. With my foot to the pedal, old school 80’s rock blaring out the windows and the wind in my hair, I headed 10 miles down the road to Big Bone Lick.

Old closed down shop on the road to Big Bone

Old closed down shop on the road to Big Bone

I haven’t been there in probably 10 years or so. Its always weird when you revisit a place after so long. Its never quite the same as you remember it, especially if the time span is from childhood to adulthood. The lake seemed smaller that I remembered, but still shimmering and beautiful. After snapping a few pics with my phone, since I failed to bring Mark (my Camera) with me, I walked up to a nearby park bench to sit for a moment and soak in some sun.

The Lake

The Lake

I noticed off in the distance, a man laying on a blanket enjoying the sun as well.  I hopped up, ready to do a little exploring, and found my way to a little dirt path. Well, I better investigate. Let me see where this leads. Turns out, the path winds completely around the whole lake. So, despite my lack of good hiking shoes, I followed the path, enjoying my time in nature.

The backside of the lake

The backside of the lake

When the path finally came back to the place where I had started, the man who was once laying, was at the bench, rolling up his blanket.  “Beautiful day!” he called out. I agreed, and mentioned that I thought it was sad not enough people understand the importance of spending time in and having a relationship with nature.  Peter, as he introduced himself, was an older man, I’d say in his late 40’s, maybe early 50’s.  He donned a leather jacket, jeans and and had a few camping utensils hanging from his belt.  He had a kind voice and spoke passionately about life.  After about 15 minutes of chatting about philosophical stuff, I asked him if I could take a picture of him by the lake, for my blog, so that I could accurately document my trip. He obliged and even offered to snap one of me by the lake for posterity.

Peter

Peter

I took down Peters email address to send him a copy of his photo, and as I looked up from my phone, he pulled me close, by my waist, stared deep into my eyes and said… “Kiss me.”  Well, I hope you all know how this turned out. Lol. In the nick of time I barely got my hand up in front of my face to stop his lips from coming into contact with mine.  Awkwardly, I cleared my throat. “I can’t”, I explained. “I’m sorry.” With a nervous laugh, he said,”You can’t blame a guy for trying. You’re smart, funny, and beautiful.”  I was honestly flattered (although also weirdly creeped out).  As I bid Peter adieu, I walked back to my car literally laughing out loud at life and how the weirdest things some times happen to me.  I don’t think I’ve laughed that hard in a very long time. So thank you Peter, for thinking I’m beautiful and also for making me belly laugh that a stranger in a park would try to make out with my face.

Before leaving I stepped into the Big Bone Lick Visitor Center and read through some historical info about the park and the area.

Visitor Center

Visitor Center

I pulled out of the park and upon reaching the exit, I realized I forgot the way I turned when I came in. So I decided to gamble. I took a left.  As I descended down a hill it was like I had driven into another time.  I turned left into the small town of Rabbit Hash, totally fascinated with the originality and authenticity of each unique building.  I parked in front of a little store. Since there weren’t many cars I wasn’t even sure that anything was open. I approached the porch of the General Store and opened the front door.

The General Store

The General Store

I felt like I walked into an eclectic, vintage version of gypsy heaven. It smelled wonderful, like old time soaps and candles. It was warm, with a wood burning stove crackling in the back of the store.  The owner, a lovely middle-aged woman with dark brown hair a warm smile and interesting jewelry, exuded this free spirited and loving energy which compelled me to introduce myself.  Terrie Markesbery is the Proprietor at the Rabbit Hash General Store and a kind soul who has passion for travel, dance, and people.  Terrie and I chatted for a long while about life, love and travel.

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Terrie

I browsed around looking at all the General Store’s treasures, while Terrie tended to customers. I pet Travis the cat who was taking a snooze in the chair. He reminded me of my Smokey (RIP). I met a few other new friends while I was there, Annie and Barry, both Farmers in NKY and Biscuit and Face Racer, the Bikers on the front porch.  Everyone there was friendly and welcoming.

Travis

Travis

Terrie was gracious enough to let me tour the Old Hashienda, which is a beautiful rustic apartment that guests can rent out for special events, festivals, or just to have a relaxing weekend.

Old Hashienda

Old Hashienda

And now here I sit, writing this blog by the wood burning stove while my cell phone charges, since it is COMPLETELY dead after taking so many pictures.  Next time for sure, I’ll have to bring along Mark for some better quality photos of one of my new favorite places!  If you ever are around Union Kentucky, and aren’t afraid of backwoods, homegrown, friendly folks, this is definitely a place I’d recommend visiting. Who knows, maybe you’ll even be lucky enough to meet Mayor (a Border Collie) Lucy Lou. You can find more information on Rabbit Hash at www.rabbithash.comAlso if you’re interested in visiting Big Bone Lick its not far outside of Union and also well worth a visit. You can find more info on Big Bone at Big Bone Lick State Park.