Buzzardroost Rock Trail Hike with the Viking

Being an adventurer is wild and exciting and involves a lot of living in and embracing the moment, but as I told a friend the other day, sometimes the moment doesn’t feel good, sometimes it can be difficult, or unsettling, maddening, sad or just plain miserable. But, we need to be in it anyway. We can’t deny ourselves the basis of what makes us human; feeling things.

Last year at the end of the summer, I was browsing craigslist for creative gigs and ran across an ad for an individual looking for a camera person to start a youtube channel with. Although my main focus is photography, I have a strong interest in video so I figured it couldn’t hurt to check it out.  I texted the number listed on the ad, and so began my friendship with Viking Greg.

In the beginning

In the beginning

We texted back and forth for a couple months and finally our schedules aligned and we met for coffee on November 19th. We talked for hours after our coffee was gone about life, philosophy, spirituality and adventure.  Although we’ve never started a youtube channel, or hell even filmed anything, we have developed an awesome organic chemistry. As the months have gone by, our friendship has grown closer and Viking Greg has proved to be an honest, trustworthy, insightful and inspirational friend.

Greg & I at my birthday party in January

Greg & I at my birthday party in January

I’ve known from the beginning that Greg had plans to leave in spring for a grand journey, starting in Ireland and ending who knows where, but as the months have passed by and our adventures as friends have just started, I find myself struggling to prepare to say goodbye, at least for the time being.  Don’t get me wrong, I am so super happy and excited for my new found friend that he is going to follow his heart, his dream, maybe even a little jealous lol, but I’m going to miss the kid.

I guess that’s one of the things about being a nomad that I’ve disliked the most, is having to say goodbye to people I’ve bonded with, befriended and loved.

Since Greg is leaving soon to embark on his new journey in life, we’ve been trying to cram in as much adventure as possible, and Thursday we finally got a beautiful day and made the hour and a half drive to Adam’s County Ohio to hike the Buzzardroost Rock Trail, considered the best view in Ohio.  Since it had rained a ton and we have had a lot of snow melt, the 4 mile round trip trail was super muddy and slick.  The Buzzardroost Rock trail is a well rounded trail with a lot of scenery and foliage changes. challenging but still intermediate hills to hike and at the end, a 500 ft high and almost 360 degree view of Adams County’s Brush Creek valley.

The last time I hiked BRR trail, the entrance was a bit tricky to find and the parking lot was located across the street from the trail head.  Now they’ve put up a new sign on main road and although it extended the trail just a bit, you no longer have to cross the road to reach it.

IMG_6843 copy

The trail is marked by orange numbered markers on the trees lining the path. There was one marking we passed that said, 37, Swing on it… Do it.  Looking around we found a long vine hanging from the next tree over and did just as instructed. After crashing into the trees a few times, we made our way to the top of the rock outcrop, stopping along the way for plenty of pictures.  Reaching the end of the BRR trail can never get old. As you walk out onto the Dolomite outcrop, you are graced with a breathtaking panoramic view of the lush green Brush Creek valley.IMG_6859 copy

For those of you like me, who don’t know what a dolomite outcrop is, let me give you a brief geology lesson. Dolomite is a sedimentary rock that contains more than 50% of the mineral Dolomite, which is both a mineral and a type of rock (confusing right?!). Dolomite is former limestone that has been dolomitized, which happens when calcium carbonate in the limestone is replaced by calcium magnesium carbonate (which is the mineral form of Dolomite).  This replacement is caused by magnesium-bearing water (normally salt water) percolating the limestone. So now we know what it is made of, but what is it? Besides just a big ‘ole rock.  The technical name for the land form that is BRR is an outcrop. An outcrop is a visible exposure of bedrock (consolidated rock underlying the surface of Earth) or ancient superficial deposits.  According to Mark Wolf of the Ohio Geological Survey Department, these particular rock outcrops in the Brush Creek valley were formed by glaciers and the Brush Creek was formed by two pre-glacial creeks.

Who knew Ohio had such a rich geological history (besides of course, the geologists)? Another one of those things we take for granted or overlook as unimportant.

After watching the sunset, we hiked back down the hill, enjoying the last bit of daylight.  By the time we reached the parking lot, the sunlight had completely vanished to expose a crisp starlit night sky.  Instead of climbing in the car right away we lay on our backs on the concrete, not saying much but just absorbing the vastness of the universe. Greg broke the silence, “I’m gonna miss ya Gypsy chick.”  And I will miss him too.

IMG_7022 copy

Hopefully one day our paths will cross again and we can share all we’ve learned in the mean time.  If you’d like to learn more about Greg’s journey and support him in his adventure, check out his page at

Advertisements

A Visit to Dark Wood Farm & a New Friend

While in Rabbit Hash, KY, as my previous post mentions (I think…) I met some new friends. Amongst those friends were a group of farmers that came down for a beer on the General Store porch. I overheard them (nosey gypsy) talking about their farms and by their appearance, gathered that they’d been working. As I normally do when I find someone or something interesting, I investigated. I introduced myself with a “sorry to interrupt but did I hear you mention farmers markets? I’ve been really thinking of going to local farmers markets for my produce.” I chatted with my new friends, Annie and Barry, and told them I’d love to come out to their farms sometime, ask some questions, learn some stuff and take some pictures. They both gave me a card and later in the week I emailed them both.  Annie responded and I was glad to hear she was as excited as me about sharing her farm and her story. She also offered me the opportunity for fair trade, which is basically where you volunteer your time at a farm in exchange for an agreed upon amount of produce. So I’m pretty pumped about doing that in the upcoming weeks and throughout the summer. Not only will I get some awesome fresh, locally grown produce, but I have the opportunity to learn from someone who I found out is very passionate at what she does.

Annie

Annie

We arranged for me to visit the farm to snap some photos of the baby plants, before they are ready for harvest and to chat with Annie about how she reached this awesome and exciting place in her life. So on Thursday April 24th, after running some errands, I headed down to Burlington Kentucky to Dark Wood Farm. Annie was out in the field working, as she spends most of her days. From a glance the first thing i noticed is this young woman with a hat and ponytail, who’s jeans and hands are covered in earth. She dons a pair of muck boots and sunkissed cheeks. She looks whole and joyful in her fields and touches each task lovingly.

Radish!

Radish!

I joined her and sat in the grass along side the rows of tiny plants that she was caring for. Annie shared with me what each type of plant was, what she was doing and why. She verbally walked me through each step, and I snapped photos as she tenderly saw to each new little growing life. I asked her how she got into farming, and then sat back and listened gratefully as she told me her story. Annie grew up in the Northern Kentucky area and was first exposed to growing food in her father’s garden as a child. She grew up snapping beans and helping with the other produce. In high school she worked at McGlasson’s farmstand on River Rd outside of Hebron KY, furthering her experience with farming and gaining farming community. Annie went on to study biology at the University of Kentucky and upon graduating she worked for The Nature Conservancy. She furthered her education in New York at the State University of New York College of Environmental Science & Forestry (what a mouthful lol) studying ecology.

Watering in the Greenhouse

Watering in the Greenhouse

When she graduated from the school who shall not be named (Harry Potter reference) she actually worked for the university at a research facility in the Adirondack Mountains. From New York she then received a job opportunity in Trout Lake Washington with Americorps doing trail work. She fell in love with the Pacific Northwest, as did I when I visited Portland in December. She later got a job with the University of Washington at a citizen science organization called COASST (Coastal Observation and Seabird Survey Team) teaching citizens how to find and record dead sea birds. I know, I know, you’re thinking the same thing I was thinking, that’s an awesome job! (Or maybe you aren’t lol) but she went on to explain the reason why these citizens were taught to look for dead seabirds along their beaches. It’s to track the population of different seabirds over a period of time so that if something like an oil spill happens they can measure the impact it has on the seabirds they’ve been tracking. They know what seabirds die when, for what reasons (ie. during their mating season, not all baby birds make it so the birds are identified, measured and recorded). It gives the citizens a sense of purpose as well as a hand in protecting their environment. They are directly involved and come to care more about the planet and the animals they study through this process. Which I think is really awesome! Who knew identifying dead sea birds could be so purposeful?

Hard working hands

Hard working hands

By this time Annie had been a lot of places and worked quite a few interesting jobs. But farming was always in the back of her mind. She had tried to have a garden everywhere she lived and now in her 30s, she began to think more about self sustainability and following her dream of farming. Since her job was part time, she volunteered at a student run farm at the University of Washington and began thinking more seriously about when she would take the leap of faith to do what she really felt would give her purpose. She always enjoyed jobs that involved physical labor, but unsure of whether or not she could actually farm for a living, she tested it out by going to live and work on a farm called Local Roots outside of Seattle. During the cold months when there was no work at the farm, she wintered at the year round Green String Farm in California. After finding in her heart that farming was where she belonged she returned back to her hometown and leased acreage and a house. So was born Dark Wood Farm. As she finished up her story, she looked out over her fields, crouched down, crumbling clods of dirt between her fingers.

Inside the Green house

Inside the Green house

I thought to myself, this is what beauty and love is about. A person is most beautiful and radiant when they can passionately put their heart and soul into what they do each day. She loves what she does, she loves the dirt, the plants, the air, the rain, and that love is clearly expressed in her voice and on her smiling face.

A proud plant mom

A proud plant mom

This is Annie’s first year as a full time farmer, and it feels great to be supporting her by sharing her farm and her story with all of you. She will be participating in several local farmers markets in the NKY area so support local farming and my new friend! You can find Dark Wood Farm on Facebook or visit www.darkwoodfarmstead.com. If you are interested in fair trade opportunities, contact Annie through her website, or contact a local farmer near you.

My Almost Make-out Session at Big Bone Lick and Randomly Running into Rabbit Hash

So this is the first blog post I’ve written on location thus far. I somehow wandered into the little town of Rabbit Hash Kentucky today.  It is the most awesome thing that has happened randomly in quite a while.  Earlier today I met one of my bridal clients to iron out the details for their upcoming wedding.  Since the coffee shop we met at was right around the corner from the venue I figured, once we wrapped up, that I could drive over and take a look to check out the lighting, setup, etc.  After my trip to the Florentine, which is in Union KY, I went driving around the area looking for a good outdoor location for bridal party photos.

The Florentine

The Florentine

About 5 minutes down the street I ran across a place called Farm Haven.  I decided to be nosy and pulled onto the property and took a look around. I couldn’t find anyone to talk to, besides an alpaca, so I walked back to my car with plans to look them up online and give them a call later. Note in phone: check! Its the first absolutely gorgeous day we’ve had in a while, so I figured why stop my adventure here. The big brown sign for Big Bone Lick State Park was staring me in the face and the gorgeous beaming sunshine and blue skies were beckoning. With my foot to the pedal, old school 80’s rock blaring out the windows and the wind in my hair, I headed 10 miles down the road to Big Bone Lick.

Old closed down shop on the road to Big Bone

Old closed down shop on the road to Big Bone

I haven’t been there in probably 10 years or so. Its always weird when you revisit a place after so long. Its never quite the same as you remember it, especially if the time span is from childhood to adulthood. The lake seemed smaller that I remembered, but still shimmering and beautiful. After snapping a few pics with my phone, since I failed to bring Mark (my Camera) with me, I walked up to a nearby park bench to sit for a moment and soak in some sun.

The Lake

The Lake

I noticed off in the distance, a man laying on a blanket enjoying the sun as well.  I hopped up, ready to do a little exploring, and found my way to a little dirt path. Well, I better investigate. Let me see where this leads. Turns out, the path winds completely around the whole lake. So, despite my lack of good hiking shoes, I followed the path, enjoying my time in nature.

The backside of the lake

The backside of the lake

When the path finally came back to the place where I had started, the man who was once laying, was at the bench, rolling up his blanket.  “Beautiful day!” he called out. I agreed, and mentioned that I thought it was sad not enough people understand the importance of spending time in and having a relationship with nature.  Peter, as he introduced himself, was an older man, I’d say in his late 40’s, maybe early 50’s.  He donned a leather jacket, jeans and and had a few camping utensils hanging from his belt.  He had a kind voice and spoke passionately about life.  After about 15 minutes of chatting about philosophical stuff, I asked him if I could take a picture of him by the lake, for my blog, so that I could accurately document my trip. He obliged and even offered to snap one of me by the lake for posterity.

Peter

Peter

I took down Peters email address to send him a copy of his photo, and as I looked up from my phone, he pulled me close, by my waist, stared deep into my eyes and said… “Kiss me.”  Well, I hope you all know how this turned out. Lol. In the nick of time I barely got my hand up in front of my face to stop his lips from coming into contact with mine.  Awkwardly, I cleared my throat. “I can’t”, I explained. “I’m sorry.” With a nervous laugh, he said,”You can’t blame a guy for trying. You’re smart, funny, and beautiful.”  I was honestly flattered (although also weirdly creeped out).  As I bid Peter adieu, I walked back to my car literally laughing out loud at life and how the weirdest things some times happen to me.  I don’t think I’ve laughed that hard in a very long time. So thank you Peter, for thinking I’m beautiful and also for making me belly laugh that a stranger in a park would try to make out with my face.

Before leaving I stepped into the Big Bone Lick Visitor Center and read through some historical info about the park and the area.

Visitor Center

Visitor Center

I pulled out of the park and upon reaching the exit, I realized I forgot the way I turned when I came in. So I decided to gamble. I took a left.  As I descended down a hill it was like I had driven into another time.  I turned left into the small town of Rabbit Hash, totally fascinated with the originality and authenticity of each unique building.  I parked in front of a little store. Since there weren’t many cars I wasn’t even sure that anything was open. I approached the porch of the General Store and opened the front door.

The General Store

The General Store

I felt like I walked into an eclectic, vintage version of gypsy heaven. It smelled wonderful, like old time soaps and candles. It was warm, with a wood burning stove crackling in the back of the store.  The owner, a lovely middle-aged woman with dark brown hair a warm smile and interesting jewelry, exuded this free spirited and loving energy which compelled me to introduce myself.  Terrie Markesbery is the Proprietor at the Rabbit Hash General Store and a kind soul who has passion for travel, dance, and people.  Terrie and I chatted for a long while about life, love and travel.

WP_20140320_15_55_50_Raw copy

Terrie

I browsed around looking at all the General Store’s treasures, while Terrie tended to customers. I pet Travis the cat who was taking a snooze in the chair. He reminded me of my Smokey (RIP). I met a few other new friends while I was there, Annie and Barry, both Farmers in NKY and Biscuit and Face Racer, the Bikers on the front porch.  Everyone there was friendly and welcoming.

Travis

Travis

Terrie was gracious enough to let me tour the Old Hashienda, which is a beautiful rustic apartment that guests can rent out for special events, festivals, or just to have a relaxing weekend.

Old Hashienda

Old Hashienda

And now here I sit, writing this blog by the wood burning stove while my cell phone charges, since it is COMPLETELY dead after taking so many pictures.  Next time for sure, I’ll have to bring along Mark for some better quality photos of one of my new favorite places!  If you ever are around Union Kentucky, and aren’t afraid of backwoods, homegrown, friendly folks, this is definitely a place I’d recommend visiting. Who knows, maybe you’ll even be lucky enough to meet Mayor (a Border Collie) Lucy Lou. You can find more information on Rabbit Hash at www.rabbithash.comAlso if you’re interested in visiting Big Bone Lick its not far outside of Union and also well worth a visit. You can find more info on Big Bone at Big Bone Lick State Park.